13 July 2015

ROADTRIP DAY 4: Disney Deeds - Big Bend to Terlingua


We had managed to allude those around us and sleep through the night undetected by paying patrons who slumbered in the surrounding log cabins.

Having got where we were going we seemed slow to move from our spot, laying claim to it carefully to avoid interruption and ignoring the few scornful looks cast our way.

We sang, stretched and strummed with the serenity Snow White once held, though our exterior aesthetics told the story of the wicked witch.

Three young deer wandered up and munched on the grass near to our sprawling station. Though he beauty of the moment was tainted by the odd swiftly moving SUV, the simple coexistence between man and beast, in a respectful balance rare to this modern world, filled us with the warmth of peaceful bliss.



The hours that followed this frequency freely as we travelled up a new trail and on to a new town.

The road led us to a sand filled horse pen full of majestic but thin beasts. We stopped to chat to them, barricaded by a barbed wire fence. In our ignorance our luring allure lead the horses to danger, as they begged with pleading eyes for sustenance from the grass patches beyond their reach.

We fed them freely but with each bite their excitement heightened and they reached, stretching their necks like giant giraffes, towards greener pastures. When they could reach no more they began to push forward, snaring themselves in the fence. Our panic heightened in unison and I ran against the wind towards the nearest man made structure about a mile away. Half way there my partner hollered my name and I turned to see the white horse, formally caught, galloping free.



Our sights were set on a ghost town of Terlingua located in the depths of the desert, and though the name filled my childlike heart with fear, as we approached the slightly scary scene, cotton candy clouds rolled in to welcome us, mildly melting the unfounded emotions dancing inside of me.

The town, quite used to the wayward traveller, welcomed us with a wiry warmth, sharing its music, wisdom and tales openly. We slept in the parking lot of the Starlight theatre, formally open to the skies, where music has been shared since the tiny town was a mercury minefield. With the jubilant celebrations of the local lads and ladies surrounding us, we slept, interrupted be neither ghost nor ghoul.



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