18 January 2017

Why and How To Participate In The Women's March On Washington ... Even If You're Not In D.C

The last activist event I went to was during COP 21. It was just after the killings occurred here in Paris and I had just started blogging about eco living. Despite Le président de la République française declaring a state of emergency in France (making it illegal to gather in large groups), I felt like I had to do something about the issues being ignored and the deaths, at numbers far greater than those which had occurred here in Paris, that would be caused by our ignorance and inaction.

In the final days of the COP I participated in a demonstration hosted by 350.org called ‘Red Lines’ for which activists were meant to create a human chain between L’Arc de Triomphe (the grave of the unknown soldier) and Porte Maillot (in the direction of the financial district) to symbolically represent the victims and perpetrators of the climate crisis. The demonstration was intended to honour the countries who would face the most damaging and deadly repercussions of an issue they had played very little part in creating, caused by the over consumption and greed of the first world. Despite its best intentions, the event ended up looking more like a festival of left wing first world privilege - complete with flamboyant costumes - than anything resembling a movement which would be relatable or moving for those with the political influence to create meaningful change. It was disappointing, and in the end, it accomplished nothing.

When Trump 'won' the American presidency, the world stood in solidarity against him and the dissolution he created. Just about every non-political person suddenly stood up and took notice. We ranted and raved on our facebook newsfeeds (myself included) asking why and how this could happen, then went on with our daily lives as if it hadn't (myself included). 

We live in a hypocritical world, each believing we are special and unique but acting as if those who live around us are not. As if their lives are less important than ours. We blame our society, but we are our society and therefore omit our rights to complain if we take no action against the reality as it stands and continue on with our idealistic views as if it is not happening. This doesn't make it go away, instead, it encourages it, telling those who pull the strings that though you may care enough to comment on it, you don't care enough to act on it. We all say we want change, but we're not necessarily ready to change ourselves (myself included); our lifestyles, products, habits, nor politically participate to make sure those changes are made. 
We all have a right to weigh in on the American election if the charlatan president-elect of the Divided States Of America is a racist, bigoted, sociopathic, bullying, lying, sexist, homophobic, climate denying, cretinous, fear-mongering, corrupt, greedy, creepy, lewd, pompous, virtueless creature. We all have this right because his decisions at this point in our existence not only affect America and all its citizens, but also the entire world and every living thing. That's how powerful this country, despite all its obvious downfalls and weaknesses, has become. 

If Trump, and the hatred and ignorance he promotes, embraces and creates bothers you, if human rights, dignity, diversity, equality, justice, empathy, inclusively and Love are things you feel are worth fighting for, than I encourage you to find a way to make your voice  meaningfully heard. 

"Never, never be afraid to do what's right, especially if the well-being of a person or animal is at stake. Society's punishments are small compared to the wounds we inflict on our soul when we look the other way.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

The Women's March on Washington will be the first of many worldwide protests which will occur to unite the whole world in positive, peaceful action. If you can't make it to Washington, there are sister marches taking place in almost EVERY MAJOR CITY (and non-major city) around the world - just click here and enter your postal code or zoom in on your area on the map to find your closest organized protest. 

But PLEASE, PLEASE, don't make the mistakes made in Paris. Represent yourself as who you are daily, don't dress up like it's a festival, it's a demonstration, not a celebration. We will all be seen for the special unique little stars that we are in other situations. If demonstrations are misrepresented because we choose to display our uniqueness like a pack of flamboyant peacocks in heat, rather than the face our friends and neighbours see daily on the street, then we won't be taken seriously. People on the other side, or no side, will not be able to see themselves in you, nor feel empathy and unity towards you. Make an intelligent sign, dress in 'normal' clothing, show your heart and your head, not your ego. 

Be sure to share this with your friends and family and convince them to come along with you. The most monumental ripples this world has seen throughout history started with one voice and rose to the roar of many. 

You can read more about 
The Women's March on Washington and how to participate HERE


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